Here are some recently asked questions

Will our Council Tax fall Why is nothing simple? Unfortunately the answer isn't. Your Council Tax is made up of 4 elements - Derbyshire County Council, Bolsover District Council, Derbyshire Constabulary and the Town Council (i.e. us). The first three elements are the same across the county, that is, every household pays the same amount in each band. Those three authorities control how much that is.
The Town Council bit is called the Precept and that is controlled by Old Bolsover Town Council.

Can I attend a Council meeting?

Council meetings are open to the public. In normal times, all Council meetings are held at the Town Hall on Cotton Street. However, as a result of government restrictions, meetings are currently taking place virtually using Zoom. These meetings are still open to the public. When the agendas are published we provide details of how you can access the meeting using a computer, tablet device, mobile phone or normal telephone.

At some meetings, there can be confidential items discussed where members of the public are asked to leave the meeting before these items can be discussed.

Can I speak at a Council meeting?

At our Full Council meetings, there is a short section of the meeting open for Public participation. If you are in attendance at a meeting, the Chair of the meeting will ask if any members of the public wish to speak.

Do Councillors get paid?

The role of Councillor at Old Bolsover Town Council is a voluntary one. Members receive no pay or allowances. The Chair / Town Mayor has an allowance of £900 per year which is used to meet expenses in carrying out the role and support local organisations and initiatives.

District Councillors and County Councillors receive a basic allowance and additional allowances for special responsibilities.

Click here for details of District Councillors and County Councillors

What do Councillors do?

Local councillors are elected by the community to decide how the Council should carry out its various activities. They represent public interest as well as individuals living within the ward in which he or she has been elected to serve a term of office.

A councillor's primary role is to represent their ward and the people who live in it. Councillors provide a bridge between the community and the council. As well as being an advocate for local residents and signposting them to the right people at the council, they will keep you informed about issues that may affect you.

As a local councillor, they are expected to:

  • respond to your queries and investigate your concerns (casework)
  • communicate council decisions that affect you
  • know your patch and be aware of any problems
  • know and work with representatives of local organisations, interest groups and businesses
  • represent your views at council meetings
  • lead local campaigns on your behalf.

Councillors are collectively responsible for making Council policy, for which they are accountable to the electorate. They are recognised nationally as the level of local government closest to people.

Councillors are not directly involved in the day-to-day provision of services to the public. This does not, of course, mean that there should be no contact between Councillors and the Clerk on such matters and, indeed, Councillors may often find that they are asked by electors to pursue matters on their behalf. However, Councillors have no executive authority and will need to deal with all matters either through a properly constituted meeting or in liaison with the Town Clerk concerning, say, a Town opportunity or problem.

It, therefore, follows that there are no circumstances where an individual Councillor can issue an instruction to the Clerk or a Contractor. Likewise, a Councillor must never act "on behalf of the Council" in the organisation of any function or service. Particular care should be taken in all types of communication, especially via comments to ensure understanding they speak as a "Town Councillor" and not on behalf of the Council as a whole. Generally, the Town Clerk on behalf of the Council issues all correspondence.

On a personal level, it is well to remember that comments from the community should be addressed to the whole of the Council and not to any individual Councillor as the Council is collectively responsible.